Longitudinal study of music therapy’s effectiveness for premature infants and their caregivers: International randomized trial (LongSTEP)

Project Department: Uni Research Health (groups: Grieg Academy Music Therapy Research Centre, Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare)

About the project

Longitudinal Study of music Therapy’s Effectiveness for Premature infants and their caregivers (LongSTEP) aims to fill a significant gap in knowledge by providing longer term use of music therapy to promote better long-term outcomes for premature infants and their caregivers.

Controlled research on the impact of music therapy for premature infants and their caregivers demonstrates short-term improvements in infant physiologic and behaviour states, feeding behaviour, and length of hospital stay; as well as decreases in parental distress and anxiety. LongSTEP fills a critical gap in knowledge by providing music therapy over a longer term from hospitalization through the first six months of life, and by assessing long-term outcomes of music therapy for both infant and parent during the first year of the infant’s life.

Since music therapy for premature infants and their caregivers is an emerging area of practice and research in Norway, this study aims to integrate best available evidence from international developments with standards of practice existing in Norwegian health care environments, to create a model of care that is culturally-relevant for social support societies. LongSTEP consists of music therapy with a high level of parental engagement during the course of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization, and a support- and consult-to-parent model of music therapy for the first six months following discharge from initial NICU hospitalization.

The model enables parents to assume a central role in the care of their infant, with the music therapist providing support and coaching to enable parents to use their innate resources to promote developmentally-appropriate co-regulation of the parent/infant dyad, improve quality of interaction and enable healthy bonding during this vulnerable time. The long-term aim is to assure healthy infant/parent relation and improve infant developmental outcomes and promote parental psychological well-being over the first year of the infant’s life.

Team and contact

LongSTEP is an international project hosted by GAMUT – The Grieg Academy Music Therapy Research Centre, a twin center collaboration between Uni Research Health and University of Bergen, which links NICUs in Bergen and Oslo with those in four other countries with similar social support cultures (Sweden, Germany, Israel, Columbia).

The core LongSTEP interdisciplinary team consists of researchers and clinicians with competence in biostatistics, international multicentre trial management, practice and theory related to music therapy for premature infants and their caregivers, psychology of parents of premature infants, infant development, neonatal intensive care, and various research methodologies.

User representatives and an international scientific advisory panel of clinicians and researchers heralding from Switzerland, United States, Poland, and Norway help to assure that the project is highly relevant to users and thoughtfully designed and conducted.

A feasibility study examining the acceptability and feasibility of the music therapy protocol and study assessment procedures is currently being carried out in collaboration with Barne- og ungdomsklinikken, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. The feasibility study is funded by the Faculty of Fine Art, Music and Design at the University of Bergen, and by POLYFON kunnskapsklynge for musikkterapi.

Core LongSTEP team members:

  • Principal investigator (1st year): Christian Gold, GAMUT, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway

  • Principal investigator (subsequent years): Łucja Bieleninik, GAMUT, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway

  • Co-investigator for international study and Principal investigator for LongSTEP feasibility study: Claire Ghetti, GAMUT, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway

  • Co-researchers: Mari Hysing and Ingrid Kvestad from RKBU Vest – Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health

  • Co-researcher: Bente Vederhus, Barne- og ungdomsklinikken, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway

  • Biostatistician: Jörg Assmus, GAMUT, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway

  • Information scientist: Jo Dugstad Wake, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway

Intended clinical sites:

  • Barne- og ungdomsklinikken, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway

  • Akershus University Hospital, Oslo, Norway

  • Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway

  • Central Hospital Karlstad, Sweden

  • Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany

  • Meir Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Israel

  • Clinica de la Mujer, Bogotá, Colombia

 

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cp: 2017-12-14 04:15:42